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Sick of holiday commercials? Sarah Haskins to the rescue!

Since I'm still in the charming stage of not having my life together, whenever I go home I can always count on my mom making sure I eat well. This is especially true during the holidays (leftovers and pumpkin cheesecake for days!). While my little brother helped out with making an excellent mostly-veggie Thanksgiving dinner, all the holiday cooking commercials I watched in between a Project Runway marathon reminded me of a great episode of Current TV's Target Women called "Feeding Your F---ing Family."

Having been praised across the feminist e-world, Sarah Haskins may be old news to some. But for those who don't know, she is my new best friend. Or, at least I want her to be. Haskins puts out the excellent Target Women segments as a part of Current TV. This feature is dedicated to analyzing the ways in which women are (you guessed it!) targeted and appealed to. Whether it's birth control, cars, the presidential candidates, or cleaning supplies, Target Women tackles it all.

Not only does Haskins cast a critical eye on consumer culture, but she does so effortlessly and hilariously. I can watch older episodes for the fourth or fifth time and still giggle at Haskins's amusingly accurate take on advertising and televised media (I especially love the yogurt and wedding shows episodes). In a time when folks still deny the existence of funny women, Haskins is throwing down poop jokes while analyzing the Disney Princesses franchise. Along with Gideon Yago, add her to my media critic crush list.

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Great commercial analysis

This is great. I;m so glad you guys are flexing your attitude-emboldened video muscle. I'm not so sure about the Gap ad that was floating over the great advertising commentary, but the content was great. Maybe the distraction of the ad is fuel for another commentary.