On Our Radar: Today's Feminist News Roundup

Good morning, all! Here's the latest feminist news on our radar...

• The arrest of 16-year-old Florida high-school student Kiera Wilmot for conducting what she described as a science experiment on school grounds is a troubling example of what sociologists see as a school-to-prison pipeline too often imposed on black teens. [The Feminist Wire]

• Environmentalist, author, and cancer survivor Sandra Steingraber took a stand against the toxic effects of fracking and corporate pollution—and served 15 days in jail for her protest. [Ms.]

• Oversharing is rampant on the Internet, to say nothing of offline. Why are women who do it judged so harshly? [Flavorwire]

• How the garment-factory tragedy in Bangladesh connects to Americans' dependence on fast fashion—and what it will take to change working conditions. [NPR]

• Jason Collins isn't the first gay man to be part of a major professional sports team, so why not read the fascinating story of Glen Burke, the former Los Angeles Dodger who made no secret of his orientation? Bonus: Burke's story proves that the high-five—that universal gesture of bro-hood—is so much gayer than anyone knew.

• Pregnancy discrimination is never okay—but when your women's-studies professor is behind it? Talk about insult to injury.  [XXfactor]

• The Awl has a great celebration of the life and work of queer theorist and literary critic Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, who would have been 63 yesterday. [The Awl]

• Got a feminist mother in your life? Celebrate her on Mother's Day with one of these thoughtful gifts, rather than the chintzy crap being pushed on TV commercials. (Chocolate is always welcome, tho.) [Viva La Feminista]

• Finally, if you love Retta—and if you're a Parks and Recreation fan, you almost definitely do—you'll want to stop whatever it is you're doing and listen to her talk about race and stereotyping in Hollywood. [NPR]

Got anything to add? If so, you know where it goes!

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NPR link

The link for " How the garment-factory tragedy in Bangladesh connects to Americans' dependence on fast fashion—and what it will take to change working conditions. [NPR]" takes you to an NY Magazine story about lesbian athletes coming out.