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On Our Radar

It's Friday, which means it's time for a look back at what blipped onto our radar here at Bitch HQ this week!

  • Amanda Hess posted a take-down of the New York Times' latest fashion trend: transexuals! 
  • Sady Doyle at The Awl wrote about feminism, pop culture, and Aliens. Needless to say, it caught our attention in all the best ways. 
  • It's "My Little Pony Week" on the Ms. blog, and yesterday this post by Kathleen Richter called out homophobic and racist messages being sent via Pony Express (don't blame her for that joke. That was all me.).
  • Slate published a piece by Connie Schultz, a fellow political spouse, in memoriam of Elizabeth Edwards.
  • In being interviewed by Barbara Walters this week, Oprah Winfrey cried when asked about her relationship with her best friend, Gayle King. BUST wants to know: Why the tears, Oprah?
  • TED (Technology, Education, Design) launched its first TEDWomen conference this week in Washington, D.C. Read about the TED Fellows chosen to attend, watch videos, read transcripts, and join the discussion here
  • And here's a review of the TEDWomen Conference by Carla Thompson at Sharp Skirts. Says Carla, "I think I was just privy to one of the most fascinating and inspiring weeks of the year. And I think an opportunity was missed to blow the conversation out of the water around women in business and women in life."

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Comments

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Stupid Pony Tricks

"It's "My Little Pony Week" on the Ms. blog, and yesterday this post by Kathleen Richter called out homophobic and racist messages being sent via Pony Express."

No, you mean homophobic and racist messages that she thinly rationalized into existence from superficial traits of the characters, even when they contradicted creator canon, taken from the marketing materials and trailers of a program the blogger had not yet deigned to actually VIEW. These criticisms have been roundly and rightly condemned as shallow by the vast majority of Ms. commenters.

All moral scolds like Richter ultimately accomplish is the promotion of "safe" programming, free of offensive content by ultimately having no content whatsoever. Shame on you for promoting Ms. Richter's inaccurate and slanderous assumptions about one of the more sophisticated, sincere, and non-pandering animated series targeted at girls in the last several decades.