Jock Bitch Power Pack: Lady Dunx Edition

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OK, so before addressing the controversy surrounding the use of the word "lame" in my earlier post (that one's gonna take some time), allow me to share some videos I stumbled upon while gathering my thoughts on the WNBA. They're all of women who can dunk. And, while I'm partially of the mind that women dunking might actually diminish what makes women's hoops special, it's still pretty cool to behold. So check it out (sorry—some of the footage is a little grainy):

First, Lisa Leslie with the first dunk ever in the WNBA:

It should be noted that in the very first WNBA game, when the league had a buzz going for it and with more people than usual tuned in from a national audience, Leslie had a chance to dunk on a breakaway fast break, and she blew it. I always wondered if, had she made it, the WNBA's fate might have been a more successful one.

Next, we have current WNBA superstar and fellow dunktress (dunktrix?) Candace Parker, with the WNBA's second dunk:

FYI: Parker is the one who just had a baby, and now all of a sudden the media wants to talk to her.

Next we have 6'8" Texan Brittney Griner, who plays for Baylor University. Griner has a great all-around game for someone her size, dunked regularly during her high school career, and—according to her father—might even hi 6'10"-6'11" by the time she's done growing:

Finally, here's Michelle Snow, who played for the great Pat Summitt at the University of Tennessee. Snow was only the third person to dunk during a women's college game:

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Comments

6 comments have been made. Post a comment.

Don't decry dunking

These are some pretty sweet videos you've posted, and on the one hand I think their inherent awesomeness makes a pretty good argument for the value of dunking in a game.

I can relate, though, to your fear "that women dunking might actually diminish what makes women’s hoops special."

But still... I dunno... While I really enjoy watching a scripted play flawlessly executed, I think dunks can have a legitimate place in a good strategy. Basketball is an emotional game, and a dunk can do a lot for a team.

A layup is obviously a higher-percentage shot, but if an athlete has the skill and ability to pull it off, the 2 points from a dunk can be more valuable for a team's momentum than the 2 points from a standard layup. Also, setting up a dunk requires either a lot of luck, or a lot of coordination from a team (if not both).

I'm also going to take this opportunity to voice a comment which should really be included in your earlier post on the WNBA, but that comment thread has really devolved into bedlam. (Sorry if the use of 'bedlam' offends.)

I covered high school athletics for a community newspaper the past two years, and during this past basketball season there was a scandal on the girls basketball team that absolutely sickened me. To make a long story short, our star player (a dynamite sophomore 5 guard and one of the most exciting athletes in our school, IMO) was forced to quit the team because of a homosexual relationship.

Her own mother forced her to quit two weeks before the end of the season, apparently because someone had seen her kissing another player.

There wee only about 7 girls on the team to start with, and 90% of what the team did was based on feeding her the ball. They lost the last 4-5 straight games of the season, finished outside of the playoffs and cut short a very entertaining season. To make the whole thing worse, she will likely not be allowed to participate in any sport whatsoever next year, since she quit the team before the end of the season.

There is no doubt in my mind that this kid has the potential to be a Division I, perhaps even professional athlete, but it seems as if her own parent's homophobia is going to prevent it. As I was reading your earlier post, I couldn't help but wonder to myself, if the WNBA had the gumption to take a more progressive stand toward homosexuality, would it have helped this girl? Would having openly gay professional athletes featured on television have made her mother more accepting?

Sorry if the use of 'bedlam' offends.

Not trying to be an asshole, but I lol'ed.

Keep fighting the good fight, girls!

On topic, I have to agree with this comment on dunking. Particularly the emotional aspect. That's what make dunking what it is.

"Sorry if the use of

"Sorry if the use of 'bedlam' offends."

No you're not. If someone was offended, you'd just imply they were clearly crazy and make some case about etymology while ignoring the fact that someone, an actual person, said they were hurt/offended.

Heaven forbid someone impinge on your vocabulary!

Prefer skill over dunks

First, I've been enjoying your articles Jonanna -- hope you keep writing about the WNBA!

(Side note: I appreciate your attempt to think carefully about your response to the critique about your use of the word "lame")

As a WNBA fan, I must say I appreciate the lack of dunking. And here's why: it weeds out the players that have absolutely no ability but dunking. NBA general managers tend to get enamored with these hyper-athletic big guys who can't really play much basketball at all. To me, that's not what makes basketball fun -- I like the rhythm of the game, good ball movement, and..well...some display of skill.

Dunking is emotional yes, and I have to say that seeing someone get dunked on will get me out of my seat...but I'll trade that for a well played game any day.

If I played in the WNBA

I would average 24 points, 15 boards and 7 assists.

I am a 6'5'', 30 year old Software Consultant who is slightly fat.

Anyone doubt that, please let me know.

It should be noted that in

It should be noted that in the very first WNBA game, when the league had a buzz going for it and with more people than usual tuned in from a national audience, Leslie had a chance to dunk on a breakaway fast break, and she blew it. I always wondered if, had she made it, the WNBA's fate might have been a more successful one Tee