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How Can Harvard Help End Rape in India?

Today, six men accused of gang rape in India head to court. If that sounds eerily familiar, it's because just two months ago, six other men also went to trial for gang rape in India in a high-profile case involving a woman fatally assaulted on the bus in New Dehli. 

After these terrible crimes come to light, we all want to see major change. In reaction to the New Delhi rape, Harvard University decided to sponsor a policy task force "to offer recommendations to India and other South Asian countries." But the group received a critique from Delhi blogger Nivedita Menon, who wrote in a post called "Harvard to the Rescue!" that Harvard would be better able to discuss rapein South Asia not from the ivory tower, but by consulting with feminists on the ground in India. "It's been a long hard haul, so it's a great relief that the Harvard Law School has stepped in to take this burden off our shoulders," writes Menon sarcastically. 

Harvard's plan is to produce a working paper to advise on the implementation of the recommendations from India's Verma Committee, a report pulled together by three members of India's judicial system that spells out crucial ways to make rape cases come to trial more quickly in India and to create harsher punshiments for people convicted of sexual assault. Feminists in the Global South may have overreacted to the plan for a working paper—it's possible that Harvard has every intention of consult women across India on what should be done. However, the general sentiment seems to be indignation that Harvard would be able to "save" the poor women of India. This is illustrated in a letter in The People's Record that charges Harvard with ignoring "the long history of Indian activists themselves fighting to end rape and sexual violence." 

There is clearly a need for collaboration internationally on rape issues, in addition to study.  

In Harsha Walia's piece on the Feminist Wire, she says, "While navigating my own relationship to Delhi and home, it has been infuriating to read Orientalist renditions of South Asian women needing saving from barbaric South Asian men." Walla sees the myth of Western superiority as a part of a facade of gender equality "'at home' that invisibilizes, for example, the gruesome gang rape in Steubenville, Ohio, and US representative Todd Akin's comments about 'legitimate rape,' and the ritualized colonial violence against Indigenous women murdered at alarming rates, and Black women in prisons and migrant women in detention centers, and women of color, poor women, transfolks, and sex workers."

Let's continue to create task forces, and study these issues. But let us also work on our transnational feminist collaboration and coalition building, so as not to continually repeat history and create different groups trying to achieve the same thing. I look forward to seeing greater coalition building between Harvard feminists and those on the ground in India.

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